Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Fashion Has No Age Limit


The fashion industry is often portrayed as a youth-orientated world run by the youngest innovators and icons. Photographer Ari Seth Cohen showcases another perspective capturing ladies aged sixty and over. His blog, Advanced Style, has attracted a large following of viewers who are fascinated by the eccentric and unique personalities. In 2014, seven of the women regularly featured were profiled for the documentary of the same name, which is available on Netflix, iTunes, and DVD.

As a student at the Fashion Institute of Technology, it is unassigned homework to read articles and watch documentaries about anything going on in the industry, so I was I attracted to this documentary when I saw it on Netflix. While watching it, I was immediately inspired. The women proved that fashion doesn’t have an age limit and that getting older is not something you should be scared of, but something you should embrace. They emphasized the importance of being unique and standing out from the crowd. Fashion isn’t just about following the trends and looking like everyone else; it’s about being individual and expressing yourself with clothes.

One of the women who especially caught my attention was Tziporah Salamon, a NYC style icon. Over many years, Tziporah, nicknamed “Tzippy”, has built an impressive collection of vintage clothing, costume jewelry, and accessories. She views fashion as an art form and expresses herself every day, never leaving the house without a complete outfit. She has a strong presence on social media, with 2,000 friends on Facebook and over 19,000 on Instagram. Her website, tziporahsalamon.com, features hundreds of pictures showcasing her unique style.

Tziporah embraces her heritage and celebrates the lives of her parents, recognizing their hard work and strength. Her parents were Hungarian Jews who survived the Holocaust and fled to Israel where she was born. They later relocated to New York City. Her parents worked in the garment industry – her father as a tailor and her mother as a dressmaker.

Recognizing that she had a story and talent that other people were interested in, she started hosting live events such as “Tziporah’s Stories (With Clothes!)” and “Art of Dressing”. During these events, she stresses style and individuality while teaching fashion as an art form.

Tziporah will perform her autobiographical, one-woman show, The Fabric of My Life, at the Museum on Wednesday, May 11 at 7 P.M., telling the story of her life with pictures and, of course, clothing. Admission is $15, $12 for students with valid ID, and free for members.

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